Autism_spectrum_disorder

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Behavioral Challenges

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may have a hard time relating to and communicating with other people. They may attempt to communicate through their behaviors. For example, children with ASDs may have a hard time telling their parents that they do not want to do an activity that is requested

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Discussing the Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) With Your Child

    Parents may wonder about when and whether to tell their child about his autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis. Following are some commonly asked questions about discussing diagnosis of an ASD with a child:

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Early Intervention Services

    Children learn by watching, imitating, and playing with others. Young children with symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) often lack some of these developmental skills, and they need to learn them. The goal of EI is to help young children gain developmental skills and to teach families some specific

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Emergency Information Form For Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)

    Family handout from Autism: Caring for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Resource Toolkit for Clinicians, 2nd Edition, developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Children With Disabilities Autism Subcommittee (ASC).

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Financial Assistance and Related Programs for Families

    Many children with ASDs are able to get support from programs funded through their state or county. Some examples are financial help, education support, medical care, job skills training, and residential or living services. Some supports are available to all children because of federal laws, such as

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Gastrointestinal Problems

    Gastrointestinal problems include constipation, diarrhea, reflux, vomiting, belly pain, and feeding problems. Some families of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) report GI problems. These symptoms can add stress to the child and family.

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Guardianship

    All teens, including teens with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), become adults and their own legal guardians on their 18th birthday. By law, when a person turns 18, her parents are no longer allowed to make medical or legal decisions for her. The only way parents can continue making decisions for their

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Health Care Transition: Moving From Adolescence to Adulthood

    Moving into adulthood can be challenging for any young person with or without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). While much attention is given to transitioning from high school to postsecondary education or to the workforce, parents should also be mindful of the transition to new doctors and medical service

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Inclusion: Elementary School

    Inclusion describes an approach toward education that allows children who require additional educational services to receive those supports in regular classrooms with typically developing peers. The goal of inclusion is for all children with disabilities to attend school in the least restrictive environment

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Inclusion: Middle and High School

    Inclusion describes an approach toward education that allows children who require additional educational services to receive those supports in regular classrooms with typically developing peers. The goal of inclusion is for all children and youth with disabilities to attend school in the least restrictive

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Intervention Approaches Used for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    As soon as the diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is made, your child should be referred for intervention services. While speech and occupational therapy are important, the social and communication differences of a child with an ASD need a therapy team. That team should use special intervention

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Complementary medicine refers to practices that are used in addition to the educational, behavioral, and medical interventions recommended by your child's pediatrician and schools.

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Lab Tests

    All children have some lab tests at birth and as part of normal checkups. Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) often need more tests. These tests can help find the cause of the disability or problems related to an ASD that may not be obvious and guide the doctor in treating your child most

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Medications and Your Child

    Medications are not the primary treatment for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Medications have not been shown to directly improve language or social skills. However, medications may help with behaviors that get in the way of progress in your child's intervention program. Such behaviors include

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Nutrition and Eating Problems

    Children with ASDs have the same general nutrition needs as all children and teens. Children with ASDs may be picky eaters, so their parents may be concerned that they are not getting the nutrients they need. For example, if a child doesn't drink milk (because the child refuses or because of a special

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  • ASDs Family Handout—School-based Services

    Schools can provide extra help to students who are struggling with the regular curriculum in several ways, even if a child does not have a diagnosed disability. The teacher in a regular classroom can informally try different teaching approaches than the one used for the rest of the class. The classroom

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